Phong Personal Blog http://www.iphong.com simple - elegant - professional Mon, 05 Jul 2010 05:00:22 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0 Sosnowski Residence / Chen + Suchart Studio, LLC http://www.iphong.com/2010/07/sosnowski-residence-chen-suchart-studio-llc/ http://www.iphong.com/2010/07/sosnowski-residence-chen-suchart-studio-llc/#comments Mon, 05 Jul 2010 05:00:22 +0000 Phong Vu http://www.iphong.com/?p=1102

Architects: Chen + Suchart Studio, LLC / Szu-Ping Patricia Chen Suchart and Thamarit Suchart
Location: Tempe, Arizona, USA
Construction Company: AED Structural Engineers, Inc., Christopher J. Sosnowski, P.E.
Construction Area: 3,427 sf or 318.40 sqm
Project Year: 2004-2006
Photography: Bill Timmerman, Chen + Suchart Studio, LLC

Sited in a 1950’s era dense neighborhood in Tempe, Arizona, the Sosnowski Residence takes the form of a courtyard house defined by three sandblasted 8-8-16 standard gray CMU walls at the main level and an exposed Virendeel truss at the upper level that ultimately characterizes the project.

The main level’s CMU walls define the major public spaces of the project, which include an outdoor courtyard, living room, dining room, kitchen, and koi garden. The public spaces are also flanked by the garage and guest bedrooms, in turn providing additional privacy from the street and the neighbors. The outdoor spaces maintain an open relationship to the residence by means of two 30’ wide expanses of operable sliding glass doors. The master suite resides in the Virendeel truss above. The integration of the courtyard and koi garden as an essential part to the daily experience enables the project to fully embrace the outdoor spaces of the front and back yards.

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The Cornerstone / JAJA Architects ApS http://www.iphong.com/2010/06/the-cornerstone-jaja-architects-aps/ http://www.iphong.com/2010/06/the-cornerstone-jaja-architects-aps/#comments Tue, 29 Jun 2010 06:14:39 +0000 Phong Vu http://www.iphong.com/?p=1094

Currently being approved by the municipality of Copenhagen, the building will act as a catalyst for urban activity, as public space surrounds the entire built structure.  The architects image the building “contributing to the area’s diversity as a building object that creates public space in front, below and behind it.”

The building’s site is an important point of entrance to the city center, marking the transition between the area’s diverse and fragmented buildings.  The context includes a sampling of different typologies, small and large residences, apartments, a future shopping mall and a station.  ”This fragmented and diverse character gives the intersection the characteristic of being an overlooked void space between the area’s many different components,” explained the architects.

As a way to unify the fragmentation, the void will be transformed into an urban space called Apollo Plads that will extend into the landscape and create the plinth where the Cornerstone rests.  ”This is a good starting point to create a place that can unify the area and ascribe it a special identity and quality.”

Although conceived as a solitary building, the Cornerstone is closely tied to its public areas, allow city goers to interact with Vanløse’s newest landmark.

All images courtesy of the architects.

PROGRAM: Offices and shops

SIZE: 6.800 m2

LOCATION: Vanløse, Denmark

YEAR: 2010

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Hawaii Preparatory Academy Energy Laboratory / Flansburgh Architects http://www.iphong.com/2010/06/hawaii-preparatory-academy-energy-laboratory-flansburgh-architects/ http://www.iphong.com/2010/06/hawaii-preparatory-academy-energy-laboratory-flansburgh-architects/#comments Mon, 28 Jun 2010 07:14:48 +0000 Phong Vu http://www.iphong.com/?p=1064

Architects: Flansburgh Architects
Location: Kamuela, Hawaii
Completion Date: January 2010
Construction Area: 6,100 square feet
Construction Value: $650/sf

Conceived as a high school science building dedicated to the study of alternative energy, the new Energy Lab at Hawaii Preparatory Academy functions as a zero-net-energy, fully sustainable building. The project’s fundamental goal is that of educating the next generation of students in the understanding of environmentally conscious, sustainable living systems. The project targets LEED Platinum and Living Building Challenge certification. Recently completed in January 2010, the Energy Lab today strives as a living laboratory, furthering its educational goals as a functioning example of sustainability.

The Energy Lab was developed in response to the science curriculum it houses. From small project rooms, to a large research center, to a laboratory, spaces were designed to encourage student discovery, exploration and experimentation. The building’s configuration facilitates scientific study both indoors and out, linking interior spaces with the surrounding landscape. Students are surrounded by the systems that they study, and constantly reminded of their methods. Hawaii Prep’s Energy Lab offers a continuous sustainable ‘teaching moment’.

The building is a LEED Platinum and Living Building Challenge candidate. It attempts two exceptionally strict building programs, the latter applying material restrictions and point-of-manufacture radius limits. The building generates all power from photovoltaic and windmill sources. It presently uses only eight percent of the energy it produces, the remainder being net-metered back into the campus grid. The building captures and filters all of its own drinking and wastewater, and generates hot water from solar thermal panels. The building is entirely naturally ventilated, and employs an experimental radiant cooling system as an alternative to air conditioning. There are many other green features but perhaps the greatest sustainable contribution is the building’s alternative energy educational mission where students actively learn from the built environment that surrounds them.

Daylighting, Sun Shading & Views: Polycarbonate skylights, wood sun screens, and interior roller shades all work together to introduce, reflect and control natural day light. These components were strategically employed to satisfy foot candle minimums, tackle glare, and enhance views, resulting in a pleasantly lit interior environment.

Natural Ventilation: The building is entirely naturally ventilated. Building automated louvers maintain temperature and relative humidity levels to maintain interior comfort. If necessary exhaust fans are activated to induce airflow.

Experimental Radiant Cooling System: As an alternative to conventional air conditioning, a radiant cooling system was designed. At night water is circulated through thermal roof panels, cooled via lower evening temperatures, then stored in a below-grade tank for use as a chilled water for air handling units during warm afternoons.

Integration with the Site:

Located at the windward edge of campus to take full advantage of the abundant trade winds that accelerate down from the hillside above. The site faces due south to picturesque 14,000 foot Mauna Kea volcano. Due southern exposure optimizes solar thermal and photovoltaic panel performance and enables many interior building views directed toward the volcano and valley below. Given the favorable Hawaiian climate and the building’s dramatic hillside setting direct connections to the outdoors are enhanced via operable glass doors. An entry court is located to the east, a large teaching porch opens directly south, and a wind sheltered court to the west sponsors and outdoor, covered classroom. The topography of the hillside is reflected in the stepped, terraced arrangement of the building’s internal spaces, where storage tanks, solar panels and other systems have been strategically located to take advantage of this change in elevation.

Integration with the Community:

The Elab online, the facility’s website, is a virtual nexus of information. The site tracks local weather data from multiple remote stations, monitors building systems and energy use, studies water consumption and rain collection, and offers all of this valuable microclimate and building data to neighboring residents of Kamuela and to the virtual community beyond. The Energy Lab’s conference room has been designed to take advantage of Hawaii’s bridge between the West Coast and Asian Mainland time zones. Where formerly Hawaii may have suffered from geographical isolation, Hawaii Prep students now benefit by engaging both sides of the pacific during their regular school day via video conferencing.

Building Systems Monitoring:

Developed to function much like the human brain, the Energy Lab is capable of regulating its breathing, cooling/heating, watering and energy generation, via input from over 250 sensors. The Energy Lab self-regulates its interior climate, maintaining temperature, relative humidity, and carbon dioxide levels in all spaces at all times. Truly a marvel, this system optimizes building performance and is believed the reason for better than anticipated yields in performance thus far.

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One Bloor East / Hariri Pontarini Architects http://www.iphong.com/2010/06/one-bloor-east-hariri-pontarini-architects/ http://www.iphong.com/2010/06/one-bloor-east-hariri-pontarini-architects/#comments Tue, 22 Jun 2010 16:32:12 +0000 Phong Vu http://www.iphong.com/?p=957

Hariri Pontarini Architects shared with us their project One Bloor East, a 753,968 sf residential project in Toronto, Canada. The 687 units are currently under construction. You can see more images and architect’s description after the break.

Positioned at the south east corner of Yonge Street and Bloor Street, this notable site sits atop two converging subways lines and marks the eastern threshold into Canada’s premier shopping district; making it one of the most active and prominent intersections in the city of Toronto. The Northerly corners of the area were re-developed in the early 1970’s, but failed to celebrate the importance of this destination by locating the retail below grade; effectively turning their back to the street. Redeveloping this site with the goal of increasing density while contributing to the public realm with new connections to transit, street level retail and improved pedestrian thoroughfare is the source of both the constraints and opportunities which form the project.

The new building is the instrument which restores the urban experience of the street, while signifying the corner as a landmark location. The building is comprised of a street level podium with retail and commercial space, and a 65-storey residential tower with sculpted undulating balconies. Carving into the existing zoning envelope, the six-storey podium terraces away from the street as it stretches northward; dissolving the corner mass and preserving the existing street scale. This allows the tower to be present at the intersection without dominating the area and permits south light to penetrate to the street below.

The undulating curved balconies produce a façade that possesses duel qualities of playfulness and control, and dramatically contrasts the surrounding modernist high-rises to the north. The interior core maintains a more regular form to avoid compromising the suites, and serves as the backdrop from which the curving facade emerges from. The fritted glass balconies pinwheel around the building; increasing in size for the preferential corner units, while capitalizing on view and light. The flowing lines of the facade will carry through to the sloped rooftop above, and stretch out into the podium below; marking key entryways into the building.

© Luxigon © Luxigon-4 © Luxigon-2 © Luxigon-1 1 Bloor Model shots 1 Bloor Model shots 1 Bloor Model shots © Mehrdad Tavakkolian-2 © Mehrdad Tavakkolian-1 © Luxigon-3 ]]>
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